Wednesday, December 02, 2009

New York Senate sinks marriage equality bill



Today, after months of public and private pressure on the New York State Senate to bring a marriage equality bill to the floor for a vote, it finally happened. The Assembly had already passed their version of the bill and Governor David Paterson had vowed to sign the bill if it reached his desk. But passage in the Senate was never a done deal and today the bill was voted down by a margin of 38 to 24.

The loss wasn't necessarily a surprise, although it was certainly disappointing, particularly coming on the heels of the heartbreaking loss in Maine. But the margin, with 8 Democrats voting against the bill and NO Republicans voting in favor was certainly a big shock. Personally, I believed that a few Republican votes might make up for the Democratic deficit that had been evident for months. That did not happen.

Tonight at Times Square, an impromptu call for a protest rally drew approximately 200 to 300 people despite the threat of rain. My photos here. Selected ones below...



Rainbow flag designer Gilbert Baker came up with this banner. Black script on yellow. "N.Y. Crime Scene".



Angered by the results, the crowd was energetic and seemed ready for action. But there was also an air of uncertainty as what the next step should be. Most of the anger seemed directed at the 8 Democrats who voted against the bill with the crowd chanting "Vote them out! Vote them out!"



Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer came out to the rally and spoke to reporters in condemnation of today's vote.



Blogger Joe Jervis (Joe.My.God) was there to cover the rally and to express his displeasure, singling out Queens Senator Hiram Monserrate.



Not proud to be a New Yorker tonight...



Update: Video of the rally from In The Life Media:

3 comments:

Some Other Guy said...

It was good to see you Andres, too bad under such unfortunate circumstances

libhom said...

I think part of the reason same sex marriage hasn't gotten far is that the overwhelming majority of lgbt people have absolutely no interest in ever getting married. Most of the activism that does exist is an understandable reaction to the vicious rhetoric of the Christian religious extremists who oppose it.

Instead of fighting for a failed, oppressive, and violent hetero institution like marriage, our movement needs to focus on issues that effect the daily lives of the majority of queers: employment discrimination, single payer healthcare, hate crimes, elder care, and housing discrimination.

The leadership of most lgbt organizations is completely out of touch with the daily lives of grassroots queers.

Eduardo Guize said...

No marriage equality in such a key place in LGBT History as New York is simply an unfortunate anomaly.